CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE [CDK]


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Kidney diseases

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means your kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood the way they should. The disease is called “chronic” because the damage to your kidneys happens slowly over a long period of time. This damage can cause wastes to build up in your body. CKD can also cause other health problems.


The kidneys’ main job is to filter extra water and wastes out of your blood to make urine. To keep your body working properly, the kidneys balance the salts and minerals—such as calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and potassium—that circulate in the blood. Your kidneys also make hormones that help control blood pressure, make red blood cells, and keep your bones strong.


Kidney disease often can get worse over time and may lead to kidney failure. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant to maintain your health.


The sooner you know you have kidney disease, the sooner you can make changes to protect your kidneys.

You are at risk for kidney disease if you have


  • Diabetes: Diabetes is the leading cause of CKD. High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, from diabetes can damage the blood vessels in your kidneys. Almost 1 in 3 people with diabetes has CKD.
  • High blood pressure: High blood pressure is the second leading cause of CKD. Like high blood glucose, high blood pressure also can damage the blood vessels in your kidneys. Almost 1 in 5 adults with high blood pressure has CKD.
  • Heart disease: Research shows a link between kidney disease and heart disease
  • People with heart disease are at higher risk for kidney disease, and people with kidney disease are at higher risk for heart disease. Researchers are working to better understand the relationship between kidney disease and heart disease.
  • Family history of kidney failure: If your mother, father, sister, or brother has kidney failure, you are at risk for CKD. Kidney disease tends to run in families. If you have kidney disease, encourage family members to get tested. Your chances of having kidney disease increase with age.1 The longer you have had diabetes, high blood pressure, or heart disease, the more likely that you will have kidney disease.

African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians tend to have a greater risk for CKD.2 The greater risk is due mostly to higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure among these groups. Scientists are studying other possible reasons for this increased risk

How serious is Type 2 Diabetes?


Early CKD may not have any symptoms


You may wonder how you can have CKD and feel fine. Our kidneys have a greater capacity to do their job than is needed to keep us healthy. For example, you can donate one kidney and remain healthy. You can also have kidney damage without any symptoms because, despite the damage, your kidneys are still doing enough work to keep you feeling well. For many people, the only way to know if you have kidney disease is to get your kidneys checked with blood and urine tests.


As kidney disease gets worse, a person may have swelling, called edema. Edema happens when the kidneys can’t get rid of extra fluid and salt. Edema can occur in the legs, feet, or ankles, and less often in the hands or face.

glucose-checker A number of factors can increase the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, which include:


  • chest pain
  • dry skin
  • itching or numbness
  • feeling tired
  • headaches
  • increased or decreased urination
  • loss of appetite
  • muscle cramps
  • nausea
  • shortness of breath
  • sleep problems
  • trouble concentrating
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

People with CKD can also develop anemia, bone disease, and malnutrition.

Kidney disease can lead to other health problems, such as heart disease. If you have kidney disease, it increases your chances of having a stroke or heart attack.


High blood pressure can be both a cause and a result of kidney disease. High blood pressure damages your kidneys, and damaged kidneys don’t work as well to help control your blood pressure.


If you have CKD, you also have a higher chance of having a sudden change in kidney function caused by illness, injury, or certain medicines. This is called acute kidney injury (AKI).


Managing Chronic Kidney Disease


If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), you can take steps to protect your kidneys from more damage.


The sooner you know you have kidney disease, the better. The steps you take to protect your Kidney from damage also may help prevent heart disease—and improve your health overall.

Ayurveda is an effective treatment for chronic kidney disease as it works to eliminate the health condition from it root causes. Kidney disease is one of the impactful health conditions; a number of people are diagnosed with. In the situation of kidney disease, kidneys losses the overall functions gradually. This gradual loss of kidney functions let the waste and toxins to build inside one’s body which further affects the other organs inside a person’s body. When the kidney disease reaches the advanced stage, the situation of kidney failure arises.


Here are the major reasons which signs towards the effectiveness of Ayurveda treatment for kidney disease:


  • Provides a permanent solution
  • Provides 100% natural medicines made of natural herbs
  • Help in the overall elimination of causes: Diabetes, Hypertension, Nephropathy
  • Work to restore damaged parts and functions of the kidneys
  • Comprehensive Prescription of Diet, Lifestyle, Medicine and Therapies.

Disclaimer: * Outcomes may vary from person to person